Author Topic: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own  (Read 1235 times)

Offline shm0

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Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« on: October 07, 2020, 09:54:45 PM »
Hi!
Is it possible to limit/prevent proccess to change their priority on ther own?
I know it is possible to force a certain priority with process lasso but that does prevent pro balance to lower the priority?
For example, chrome spawns multiple sub tasks with different priority, some with idle and one (or more) with a priority higher than normal.
How to prevent chrome from setting the priority higher than normal but leave the idle ones as they are?

The closed I could get was:
Add a wildcard rule to set processes to normal at startup.
But this also overwrites priority of process lasso itself and the processes that spawn with a lower priority.

Thanks.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2020, 10:10:55 PM by shm0 »

Offline edkiefer

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Re: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2020, 08:11:56 AM »
Hi!
Is it possible to limit/prevent proccess to change their priority on ther own?
I know it is possible to force a certain priority with process lasso but that does prevent pro balance to lower the priority?
For example, chrome spawns multiple sub tasks with different priority, some with idle and one (or more) with a priority higher than normal.
How to prevent chrome from setting the priority higher than normal but leave the idle ones as they are?

The closed I could get was:
Add a wildcard rule to set processes to normal at startup.
But this also overwrites priority of process lasso itself and the processes that spawn with a lower priority.

Thanks.
It seems all browsers do this and it is a "feature" of them to dynamically alter priority according to workload.
The short of it is best to let it be, the program is coded that way and forceing priority externally is probably a bad idea.
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Offline Jeremy Collake

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Re: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2020, 08:49:49 AM »
There is not presently any feature of Process Lasso that would accomplish that.

Maybe somewhere in Chrome there is a setting to prohibit higher than normal priority classes, but I doubt it.

ProBalance doesn't act on any processes of non-normal priority class by default, so it won't touch those instances unless you change the ProBalance settings.

I concur with Ed in that you probably don't want to interfere with the browser's internal priority class management.
Software Engineer. Bitsum LLC.

Offline shm0

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Re: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2020, 03:22:26 PM »
Well chrome is getting worse and worse regarding cpu usage (also the constant hdd access... to trash SSDs faster?).
After a while the browser eats up the CPU and that causes my games to stutter, restarting it fixes it.
Not only chrome change the priority. The steam webhelper app does the same (also browser related) and the blizzard battle.net app.
I see no point why those programs should have higher priority than normal.

The wildcard approach didn't work, it gets automatically removed somehow.
So I setup process lasso to set the priority to normal for those programs.
I have one question, when using the strict mode, what does it do? Does it prevent pro balance to change priority to a lower one?

Offline edkiefer

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Re: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2020, 04:51:14 PM »
Well chrome is getting worse and worse regarding cpu usage (also the constant hdd access... to trash SSDs faster?).
After a while the browser eats up the CPU and that causes my games to stutter, restarting it fixes it.
Not only chrome change the priority. The steam webhelper app does the same (also browser related) and the blizzard battle.net app.
I see no point why those programs should have higher priority than normal.

The wildcard approach didn't work, it gets automatically removed somehow.
So I setup process lasso to set the priority to normal for those programs.
I have one question, when using the strict mode, what does it do? Does it prevent pro balance to change priority to a lower one?
First thing I would limit using browser while playing games or at very least limit how many tabs are open in it.
As to your question, If you manually set a priority PL will set that priority when it starts, if you enable  "forced mode" PL will keep trying to make sure that process is set to the priority you set it.
If you want to set a child of a parent process different than the parent, while the child process (one that starts from main program). right click on that process and change it through the menu option to CPU priority.

As Jeremy mentioned if you want Probalance to act on non normal CPU priority class there is an option in advance settings of Probalance (Menu options>CPU>Probalnce settings>Advanced>"Do not act on processes of non-normal priority").
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Offline Jeremy Collake

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Re: Limit/Prevent proccess to change priority on their own
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2020, 05:38:52 PM »
Some instances of chrome are special instances, like rendering and GPU acceleration, and thus will appropriately use a higher priority. If they are unusually active, you need to consider what sites you are visiting and/or what Chrome extensions are in use.

Chrome has a built-in task manager that may help.

Forced Mode in combination with a persistent priority class would cause ProBalance actions to be immediately undone for target processes. However, that would be an odd use of it - it'd be better to simply exclude those processes from ProBalance.

In the end, I am doubtful that you'll derive any performance improvement from fiddling with the priority classes of your Chrome instances.
Software Engineer. Bitsum LLC.