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Using Process Lasso alongside other 'CPU optimization' software?

Started by Dreamland Fantasy, August 09, 2015, 06:21:24 PM

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Dreamland Fantasy

Hi there,

I've just downloaded Process Lasso and I have been quite impressed with it so far! I do have one query though. At present I also run other 'core tuning' software and I was wondering would this be beneficial or detrimental to Process Lasso's efficiency?

Kind regards,

Francis

Jeremy Collake

Process Lasso is designed to run along-side any other optimization software, it will stay out of the way and/or not take action if there is interference.

That said, I wouldn't recommend using any other software with Process Lasso, it'd be better to disable any functionality of other software that is similar to Process Lasso. Most of the time the software from these larger companies is all for show, marketing driven, more so than functionally driven like Process Lasso. Since our marketing budget is present $0, our software has to work. Most other companies are more concerned with creating software that just appears to work.

And that particular program, which I redacted the name of, is particularly notorious for being sub-standard, and from a company that often employs deceitful tactics, but I'll let you and others judge on your own.
Software Engineer. Bitsum LLC.

Dreamland Fantasy

Thanks for the quick reply Jeremy! (^_^)

To be honest, I am seeing more benefits from using Process Lasso than the other core tuning software I had been using. One area I've noticed that the two 'conflict' with each other is with the core parking. The other core tuning software attempts to spread the workload across as many of the cores as possible which, I guess, makes it more difficult for the cores the be parked.

Kind regards,

Francis

BenYeeHua

QuoteTo be honest, I am seeing more benefits from using Process Lasso than the other core tuning software I had been using. One area I've noticed that the two 'conflict' with each other is with the core parking. The other core tuning software attempts to spread the workload across as many of the cores as possible which, I guess, makes it more difficult for the cores the be parked.

I will said that just disable the core-parking, then handle it to Windows to spread them,
Except you are Windows XP, normally the thread will be spread between core, unless it is mainly single thread which will having a bad performance by switching between core. :)

And ya, unless you are using Battery all the time, or you are running some servers CPU, then getting core parked is very strange, IMO. :D

Jeremy Collake

I am doubtful any conflict is the result of an attempt to 'spread the load' to be honest.

It may simply disable core parking, as does Process Lasso in it's 'Gaming mode' or Bitsum Highest Performance power plan. We pioneered disabling core parking here at Bitsum, then everyone copied us.

Any software that attempts to 'spread the load' over CPU cores is going to inevitably fail. That is low-level thread balancing that should be left to the Windows scheduler. Doing it wrong can result in substantial performance degradation, including core thrashing and other problems.

Only the Windows CPU scheduler knows enough about the running threads to be able to appropriately decide which core to place them on.

And, of course, for single threaded applications, or applications that primarily have a single CPU bound (active) thread, there is no way to divide that workload up among the cores. A single thread can only ever be executed by one core at a time. It can be swapped around from core to core, but every time that happens the CPU cache is lost, resulting in what is known as 'core thrashing'.

For Process Lasso, I recommend to users to make minimal CPU affinity adjustments. They may want to limit an application to X cores, for instance, but should not go around trying to excessively micro-manage CPU affinity assignment.
Software Engineer. Bitsum LLC.

BenYeeHua

QuoteFor Process Lasso, I recommend to users to make minimal CPU affinity adjustments. They may want to limit an application to X cores, for instance, but should not go around trying to excessively micro-manage CPU affinity assignment.
Yes, like you are recording/live streaming, and you just want to limit the core that it can use.
Of cause, in this example, it is better that just set how many threads for x264. ;D